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Spaceraccoon's Blog

InfoSec and White Hat Hacking

Solving DOM XSS Puzzles

DOM-based Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities rank as one of my favourite vulnerabilities to exploit. It’s a bit like solving a puzzle; sometimes you get a corner piece like $.html(), other times you have to rely on trial-and-error. I recently encountered two interesting postMessage DOM XSS vulnerabilities in bug bounty programs that scratched my puzzle-solving itch.

2Q21: New Year's Reflections

Wishing you and your loved ones a very happy new year!

The InfoSecurity Challenge 2021 Full Writeup: Battle Royale for $30k

From 29 October to 14 November 2021, the Centre for Strategic Infocomm Technologies (CSIT) ran The InfoSecurity Challenge (TISC), an individual competition consisting of 10 levels that tested participants’ cybersecurity and programming skills. I took away important lessons for both CTFs and day-to-day red teaming that I hope others will find useful as well. What distinguished TISC from typical CTFs was its dual emphasis on hacking AND programming - rather than exploiting a single vulnerability, I often needed to automate exploits thousands of times. You’ll see what I mean soon.

All Your (d)Base Are Belong To Us, Part 2: Code Execution in Microsoft Office (CVE-2021-38646)

By searching for DBF-related vulnerabilities in Microsoft’s desktop database engines, I took one step towards the deep end of the fuzzing pool. I could no longer rely on source code review and dumb fuzzing; this time, I applied black-box coverage-based fuzzing with a dash of reverse engineering. My colleague Hui Yi has written several fantastic articles on fuzzing with WinAFL and DynamoRIO; I hope this article provides a practical application of those techniques to real vulnerabilities.

All Your (d)Base Are Belong To Us, Part 1: Code Execution in Apache OpenOffice (CVE-2021-33035)

This two-part series will share how I got started in vulnerability research by discovering and exploiting code execution zero-days in office applications used by hundreds of millions of people. I will outline my approach to getting started in vulnerability research including dumb fuzzing, coverage-guided fuzzing, reverse engineering, and source code review. I will also discuss some management aspects of vulnerability research such as CVE assignment and responsible disclosure.